British romanticism essay questions

In the legend surrounding The Renaissance , Pater’s book exploded onto the Victorian cultural scene in 1873 and, with its bold embrace of atheism and hedonism, plunged him into a scandal from which his career never recovered. While this legend contains elements of truth, the actuality seems to have been more complex. In the first instance, The Renaissance drew disapproval within the hothouse world of Oxford, where Pater spent his academic career. Negative responses came especially from Oxford’s religious and conservative quarters. [6] John Wordsworth, one of Pater’s former students and Chaplain of Brasenose College, wrote an oft-quoted letter to Pater in 1873 describing his pained disappointment in the book:

The Modern Period traditionally applies to works written after the start of World War I . Common features include bold experimentation with subject matter, style and form, along with encompasses narrative, verse, and drama. Yeats’ words, “Things fall apart; the center cannot hold” are often referred to when describing the core tenant or “feeling” of modernist concerns. Some of the most notable writers of this period, among many, include the novelists James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, Aldous Huxley, . Lawrence, Joseph Conrad, Dorothy Richardson, Graham Greene, . Forster, and Doris Lessing; the poets . Yeats, . Eliot, . Auden, Seamus Heaney, Wilfred Owens, Dylan Thomas, and Robert Graves; and the dramatists Tom Stoppard, George Bernard Shaw, Samuel Beckett, Frank McGuinness, Harold Pinter, and Caryl Churchill. New Criticism also appeared at this time, led by the likes of Virginia Woolf, . Eliot, William Empson and others, which reinvigorated literary criticism in general. It is difficult to say whether or not Modernism has ended, though we know that postmodernism has developed after and from it; but for now, the genre remains ongoing.

Antoine-Nicolas de Condorcet (1743-1794) openly embraced Enlightenment progressivism. Like Voltaire, his Sketch for a Historical Picture of the Progress of the Human Mind (published posthumously in 1795) viewed the past as a progress of reason, but was more optimistic about the inevitable progress of liberal ideals such as free speech, democratic government, and the equity of suffrage, education, and wealth. The point of history was not only a description of this progress. Because the progress is lawful and universal, history is also predictive and, what is more, articulates a duty for political institutions to work toward the sort of equalities that the march of history would bring about anyway. The historian is no mere critic of his time, but also a herald of what is to come. Widely influential on the French Revolution, Condorcet also made a significant impression on the systematizing philosophies of history of Saint-Simon, Hegel, and Marx, as well as laid the first blueprints for systematic study of social history made popular by Comte, Weber, and Durkheim.

Dr Stephanie Forward is a lecturer, specializing in English Literature. She has been involved in two important collaborative projects between the Open University and the BBC: The Big Read, and the television series The Romantics , and was a contributor to the British Library’s Discovering Literature: Romantics and Victorians site and to the 20th century site. Stephanie has an extensive publications record. She also edited the anthology Dreams, Visions and Realities ; co-edited (with Ann Heilmann) Sex, Social Purity and Sarah Grand , and penned the script for the . Blenheim Palace: The Churchills and their Palace .

Millais’s painting represents the death of Ophelia from Shakespeare’s Hamlet . Driven mad with grief after her father Polonius was murdered by Hamlet, her lover, she falls into a stream and drowns. The flowers she holds are symbolic: the poppy means death, daisies innocence and pansies love in vain. The painting was regarded in its day as one of the most accurate and elaborate studies of nature ever made. The background was painted from life by the Hogsmill River in Surrey. Elizabeth Siddall posed for Ophelia in a bath of water kept warm by lamps underneath.

British romanticism essay questions

british romanticism essay questions

Dr Stephanie Forward is a lecturer, specializing in English Literature. She has been involved in two important collaborative projects between the Open University and the BBC: The Big Read, and the television series The Romantics , and was a contributor to the British Library’s Discovering Literature: Romantics and Victorians site and to the 20th century site. Stephanie has an extensive publications record. She also edited the anthology Dreams, Visions and Realities ; co-edited (with Ann Heilmann) Sex, Social Purity and Sarah Grand , and penned the script for the . Blenheim Palace: The Churchills and their Palace .

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